Friday, May 29, 2020

Legalization of Light Drugs Essay - 275 Words

Legalization of Light Drugs (Essay Sample) Content: Legalization of Light drugs use:Pros and Cons of Light Drugs Legalization (e.g.Marijuana)Cleon LewisPolitical Science 304Professor McRidisFebruary 16, 2015Discuss Pros and Cons of Light Drugs Legalization (e.g. Marijuana)Pro or against, drugs are agreeably a major influential force in our society today; therein yielding the debate on the need to legalize light drugs and as expected, stirring numerous controversies with both proponents and opposers vehemently putting forth their views as observed in the subsequent paragraphs of this essay. Light drugs or commonly known as soft drugs is a group of psychoactive drugs that are believed to be non-addictive, or rather, mildly addictive and do pose less dangers after its use as opposed to the Hard drugs which similarly are psychotic drugs but are extremely addictive and are perceived to be especially damaging to the entire health of the user indiscriminately. The word light in the moot topic implies that the drug causes no o r insignificant harm to the user and marijuana being the ultimate epitome and thus the basis of this thesis.[Jeffery A. Miron. The Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Prohibition, (2005, June) /mironreport.html (accessed June 7, 2010).] Borrowing from the school of thoughts of the economic and social impacts of light drugs legalization advocates, The Economic Impacts of Marijuana Legalization, David G. Evans, Esq., Executive Director, Drug Free Projects Coalition, researches on the following core points:Light drugs legalization exhibit mammoth economic benefits to the country; legalization of soft drugs offers reduction in spending on the criminal justice costs of marijuana law enforcement and revenue losses from shifts in law enforcement policies. In The Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Prohibition, Jeffrey A. Miron argues that "legalization will reduce the need for prosecutorial, judicial, correctional and police resource spending by approximately $7.7 billion-13.7 billion per year and even though some revenue from court fines and asset forfeitures would be lost, the gains surpass the loss," 1 this results to budgetary savings. Many countries` prisons, America being the case of reference, get filled to the brim with people who got long and unfair sentences for possession of the drug. Part of the attraction of soft drug, marijuana is that it is illegal; an example being alcohol in the 1920à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s. Before it was criminalized, young people didnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬t take an interest in it. After its criminalization, people who did not have interest became eager and started drinking it. Also, those who had been using it before suddenly were criminals. If alcohol and tobacco, which are so much worse for you, are legal, then why isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬t cannabis? Which similarly is a light drug?Legalization of light drugs would see to disappearance of a major part of organized crimes globally. In America, at the Mexican border, there would be reduction in crime, mainly becau se the Mexican drug lords would no longer profit from drug sales which are non-taxed and illegal; thus marijuana should be extremely regulated by law. With that said, Marijuana can be hugely beneficial to the government and the citizens at large. Tax revenue could significantly increase with the legalization of marijuana because of its huge popularity in the society. State surveys, Pew Research Center (Seth Motel) has shown that nearly half, about forty five percent of Americaà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s population has tried marijuana at least once, bearing in mind this is while it is illegal and harder to obtain than it would be if it were legal. That turnover calculated would be a whooping forty to one-hundred billion dollars in annual tax revenue. Thus legal marijuana production would create jobs both domestically and globally. Locally, dispensary shops would create numerous legitimate jobs for people. Globally, producers all around the world would have new job opportunities involving the produc tion of cannabis sativa for international trade as the case of tobacco therefore helping aid in the reduction of global unemployment and jumpstarting the world over economy.In the Providence Journal, Joycelyn Elders, MD writes "The evidence is overwhelming that marijuana can relieve certain types of pain, nausea, vomiting and other symptoms caused by such illnesses as multiple sclerosis, cancer and AIDS -- or by the harsh drugs sometimes used to treat them. And it can do so with remarkable safety. Indeed, marijuana is less toxic than many of the drugs that physicians prescribe every day," recently, there has been renewed scientific interest in examining the medical efficacy of cannabis in specific patient populations. It was used as a powerful appetite stimulant which helped patients that had HIV/AIDS or cancer patients going through chemotherapy as a sedative for, example, both the Institute of Medicine and the NIH recently reported medicinal cannabis might be useful in the treatme nt of pain in HIV+ patients. HIV+ patients experience a number of clinical sequelae to the infection, even when they are otherwise considered clinically asymptomatic. Sleep abnormality being such earliest sequela. In major surgeries marijuana is used as an anaesthetic drug to avert pain during the operation thus contributing to medical success globally thus managing to curb diseases which have proven to be unconquerable in the earlier times.[Joycelyn Elders, MD, Former US Surgeon General Editorial, Providence Journal (March 2004).] As clearly put and jotted down above, there is definitely a rejoinder on the decriminalization of light drug use and those who oppose the legalization put forth very clear reasons succinctly and with the same veracity that the proponents argue. With that, ità ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s now time to delve into the cons of light drugs legalization and borrowing from the research works of, British Lung Foundation, "Smoking Gun: The Impact of Cannabis Smoking on Respiratory H ealth, "the following vital points emerge:In The Impact of Cannabis Smoking on Respiratory Health, British Lung Foundation argue that "3-4 Cannabis cigarettes a day are associated with the same evidence of acute and chronicbronchitis and the same degree of damage to the bronchial mucosa as 20 or more tobacco cigarettes a day. Cannabis smoking is likely to weaken the immune system. Infections of the lung are due to a combination of smoking-related damage to the cells lining the bronchial passage and impairment of the principal immune cells in the small air sacs caused by cannabis,à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‚ as contrary to the proponentsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ belief that marijuana is medically beneficial we do find a vital health issue from this accredited research work by modern ISO Certified health aficionados raising a grave health issue on the cannabis (light drug) usage which actually outweigh the cigarettes effect which widely cause lung cancer and so do oppose its legalization and actually only some c omponents in the cannabis are medically important if extracted by qualified scientists as contradicted by raw marijuana smoking famously known in US as à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã‹Å"pot smoking`.[British Lung Foundation,Smoking Gun:The Impact of Cannabis Smoking on Respiratory Health(a publicly disseminated report:Nov.2002).] Light drugs, marijuana, just like Hard drugs, cocaine, are highly addictive and do exhibit serious withdrawal syndromes on heavy users which basically in clinical terms is an acute addiction. In the Marijuana Abstinence Effects in Marijuana Smokers Maintained in Their Home Environment, Alan J. Budney, PhD argues that, "This study validated several specific effects of marijuana abstinence in heavy marijuana users, and showed they were reliable and clinically significant. These withdrawal effects appear similar in type and magnitude to those observed in studies of nicotine w...

Saturday, May 16, 2020

The Gospel Of Wealth By Andrew Carnegie Essay - 918 Words

Since the nineteenth and twentieth century, there has always been a division between the wealthy and unfortunate. During these times the higher class continued to prosper while the lower class remained at the bottom, the separation continues to grow. Three men vocalize their views on the social division, capitalism, and individualism. Andrew Carnegie, an industrialist, believed the rich should distributed their wealth to benefit society while they’re alive. Carnegie elaborates this idea in his article, The Gospel of Wealth, written in 1889. Russell Conwell, a philanthropist, expresses in his speech, Acres of Diamonds, men should utilize their surrounding opportunities to make themselves wealthy. Edward Bellamy, a socialist, wrote Look Backward about a wealthy young man, Julian West, who enters hypnotic sleep in 1887 and awakes 113 years later. Although, the men state similar matters their views contrast, Carnegie and Conwell would most likely be critical to Bellamy’s vision. Julian West is educated and the third generation of his family to have great fortune. West’s life of luxury succeed through â€Å"support from the labor of others, rendering no sort of service in return (Bellamy).† When West enters hypnotic sleep and awakes in 2000 he realizes the 20th century is very different from the 19th. Bellamy’s Looking Backward was vastly popular particular among the middle class. His vision is desired by the middle class because it’s better than today’s world. Bellamy’s visionShow MoreRelatedAndrew Carnegie And The Gospel Of Wealth957 Words   |  4 PagesAndrew Carnegie (1835-1919) is a prime example of the phrase, from rags to riches. During his early and teenage years, Carnegie went through poverty. After coming up with crafty investments and going through various jobs, he rose to great prosperity. Because he has experienced poverty and knows that it is a well-known problem, â€Å"Carnegie sought to u se philanthropy to provide opportunities for individuals to help themselves.† Unlike Carnegie, William Graham Sumner (1840-1910), an influential professorRead MoreAndrew Carnegie Gospel Of Wealth1161 Words   |  5 Pages Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish immigrant, born in 1835. His first foray into the world of work was as a bobbin boy, at the age of 13, where he earned $1.20 per week. Carnegie quickly gained skills and proved his work ethic, until he landed a job with the Pennsylvania Railroad, and was promoted to superintendent by the age of 24 (Carnegie.org, 2015). From there, Carnegie’s vision and success grew exponentially, and now his name is often mentioned alongside the likes of Henry Ford, ThomasRead MoreThe Gospel Of Wealth By Andrew Carnegie1180 Words   |  5 PagesWealth can be defined as a surplus. This surplus is distributed among a society. The distribution creates associations among the people of the society with respect to wealth. The Gospel of Wealth, written by Andrew Carnegie, describes two classes and the association of wealth between them. Adam Smith’s passage, Of the Natural Progress of Opulence, similarly, includes a reciprocal relationship of production between the town and country. Unlike the other essays, Marx’s, Communist Manifesto, debunksRead MoreAndrew Carnegie The Gospel Of Wealth Summary1044 Words   |  5 PagesAndrew Carnegies The Gospel of Wealth: Why Now? Makayla Newberne, The Times’ Editor in Chief In case you missed reading the June, 1889 issue of the North American Review, Andrew Carnegie submitted some words of wisdom entitled â€Å"The Gospel of Wealth†. In this article, Carnegie shares his beliefs as to what the moral obligations of the wealthy are to their fellow citizens. Andrew Carnegie, a Scottish immigrate to the United States in 1848, is a self-made millionaire and agreeable one of the richestRead MoreEssay on The Gospel of Wealth, by Andrew Carnegie975 Words   |  4 PagesIn the â€Å"Gospel of wealth†, Andrew Carnegie argues that it is the duty of the wealthy entrepreneur who has amassed a great fortune during their lifetime, to give back to those less fortunate. Greed and selfishness may force some readers to see these arguments as preposterous; however, greed is a key ingredient in successful competition. It forces competitors to perform at a higher level than their peers in hopes of obtaining more money and individual wealth. A capitalist society that allows thisRead MoreAndrew Carnegie on the Gospel of Wealth1250 Words   |  5 PagesAndrew Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland in 1835. His father, Will, was a weaver and a follower of Chartism, a popular movement of the British working class that called for the masses to v ote and to run for Parliament in order to help improve conditions for workers. The exposure to such political beliefs and his familys poverty made a lasting impression on young Andrew and played a significannot role in his life after his family immigrated to the United States in 1848. Andrew CarnegieRead MoreAdam Smith And Andrew Carnegie And The Gospel Of Wealth1260 Words   |  6 Pagescontinuous disparity of wealth and income can cause constant economic problems within a society. Although it is not apparent all the time, there are few benefits of discrepancy itself such as individual wealth, capital, and labor. Both Smith and Carnegie have distinct beliefs about wealth that differentiate from one another, yet are similar in certain ways. Adam Smith confined all his ideas about the common man in his â€Å"Wealth of Nations†. Whereas, in the â€Å"Gospel of Wealth,† Andrew Carnegie had distinct beliefsRead MoreAnalysis Of Andrew Carnegie s The Gospel Of Wealth1950 Words   |  8 PagesOld Money Spoils There are many dangers of leaving great sums of inheritance money to the children of those who accumulated their own fortunes. Andrew Carnegie, a self-made philanthropist millionaire who gave away $350 million and built 2,509 libraries before his death in 1919, sees this as a great problem as well and writes about it in â€Å"The Gospel of Wealth;† along with how he believes that the highest obligation of those who have amassed a great fortune is to return their money to the societies whereRead MoreEssay about The True Gospel of Wealth: Andrew Carnegie.698 Words   |  3 PagesTrue Gospel of Wealth: Andrew Carnegie The True Gospel of Wealth, an article written by one of the richest, most powerful men of the 19th century, is a guide to a nation virgin to mass amounts of wealth, and power. Carnegie is a self made millionaire, who immigrated to the United States with less than a dollar in his pocket. This fact would serve important in Carnegies epic rise to fortune, also in developing such philosophical understandings as, The True Gospel of Wealth. Andrew CarnegieRead MoreJessica Avalos Avalos 1. Professor1114 Words   |  5 Pagesindustrialist, such as Andrew Carnegie, there were many differences of opinions on the execution of capitalism between these industrialists and their workers. Andrew Carnegie expressed his ideas and views in article, â€Å"The Gospel of Wealth,† in which he outlines the duties of industrialist to better the life of their workers and community. On the other hand, a working man wrote â€Å"A Work Mans Prayer,† a sarcastic response to Andrew Carnegies â€Å"The Gospel of Wealth,† clearly against what Andrew Carnegie believes and

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Innocence...Forever Lost Essay - 1048 Words

A beautiful flower with delicate petals sits in a lush green jungle. As a violent storm with fierce winds surfaces on the horizon, the flower yields with each gust. Unable to withstand the torrential downpour and harsh winds, it loses its petals and snaps from the intense pressure. This exact thing happens to Mary Anne as â€Å"The Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong† unfolds. Even though people have the capacity to endure great tragedy, suffering and violence, the sheer brutality of war permanently strips the innocence from Mary Anne and the devastation becomes engrained to her soul. The Vietnamese culture and the graphic scenes enliven and empower Mary Anne and as â€Å"she enters the wild, uncivilized jungle and becomes irrevocably enthralled by the†¦show more content†¦Each new discovery quickly sheds each individual layer as she submits to its force. Just like that delicate flower, Mary Anne arrived so young, fresh and beautiful and now part of her tries to withstan d the pounding Mark sees the changes in her. They are subtle at first; he even tries to encourage her to distance herself from it, all the way he does. You have to protect yourself from the storm if you want to be protected and Mark knows this. Mary Anne so naive and inexperienced in the world; she wants to embrace it and feel it all full force yielding to the strong winds and giving to its strength. Mark saw this as O’Brien writes about how serene her face becomes in time of action â€Å"He was proud, yes but also amazed. A different person, it seemed, and he wasn’t sure what to make of it† â€Å"For centuries we have seen casualties of war; soldiers who have had various physical injuries and scars that last a lifetime. Yet until the 20th century little was known about the emotional effects of war on soldiers†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (Tian 2009). Mary Anne was not a soldier, but is still exposed to all of the same dangers and violence as soldiers typically were in the Vi etnam War. The average age of an enlisted soldier in Vietnam was twenty something years old. Here is Mary Anne, a seventeen year old untrained girl, seeing the victims come in one after another. She bandages them up, notShow MoreRelatedCatcher in the Rye vs Frankenstein Novel Study Essay1304 Words   |  6 Pages In today’s world, innocence cannot be preserved forever. As humans age, they lose their innocence due to the corruption that exists in society. This is demonstrated in the two novels, Catcher in the Rye and Frankenstein. The two authors, J.D. Salinger and Mary Shelley prove this statement through their use of various literary devices. Key characters in both novels- Holden and the creature- learn through personal experiences that innocence cannot, in fact, be preserved forever, and they both faceRead MoreThe War Of The American War1370 Words   |  6 Pagesfirst time television crews were allowed access to all aspects of war leading to the loss of innocence with a n ation itself. Each night America would sit in front of the television for the nightly news and watch in horror. The numbers of the wounded and killed were reported daily during the news. Over fifty thousand military personnel lost their lives in Vietnam. Consequently, America lost its innocence and belief in its government. Protests against the war tore America apart (Baron, Robert C., andRead MoreSalinger s The Catcher s The Rye 1303 Words   |  6 PagesIrving Howe, a literary and social critic said, â€Å"The knowledge that makes us cherish innocence makes innocence unattainable† (BrainyQuote). The Catcher in the Rye, a novel by J.D. Salinger tells of a very important part Holden Caulfield s life. Holden, a 17 year old from New York, writes about the events that follow him flunking out of Pencey Prep School. Holden is very critical of everyone around him, except the small group of people that he protects with his life. He cherishes the youth childrenRead MoreSymbols in The Catcher in t he Rye967 Words   |  4 Pagesthe innocence of childhood and dreams of protecting that innocence by being a catcher in the rye. But sooner or later Holden will realize that eventually children grow up. In The Catcher in the Rye three symbols that have significant meanings and contributions to the story as a whole are Holden erasing profanity, the museum, and the red hunting hat. The first symbol is Holden erasing profanity off the school wall. This act symbolizes his realization that he can’t protect children forever. HoldenRead MoreBless Me, Ultima797 Words   |  4 PagesThe loss of innocence in life is an inevitable process. Losing one#8217;s innocence comes merely by growing up. The philosophy of the loss of one#8217;s innocence is a definite theme in the book Bless Me, Ultima. This theme is displayed throughout the entire story and plot of the novel. There is loss of innocence all around the main character, Tony, with his brothers and the people he meets. Tony also loses a great deal of his own innocence to the harsh realities of the world which marks his transitionRead More Bless Me, Ultima Essay773 Words   |  4 Pages The loss of innocence in life is an inevitable process. Losing oneamp;#8217;s innocence comes merely by growing up. The philosophy of the loss of oneamp;#8217;s innocence is a definite theme in the book Bless Me, Ultima. This theme is displayed throughout the entire story and plot of the novel. There is loss of innocence all around the main character, Tony, with his brothers and the people he meets. Tony also loses a great deal of his own innocence to the harsh realities of the world which marksRead More`` Candide `` : Innocence And Experience857 Words   |  4 Pages In the Neo-classical novel Candide by Voltaire the theme of innocence and experience is prevalent through the protagonist, Candide, especially through his journey of finding the prescription of how to live a useful life in the face of harsh reality. In William Blake’s collection of Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience the two characters, tyger and lamb, show how we lose our innocence to gain experience. Although the innocence and experience are paradoxical terms, we can solve the paradoxRead MoreEssay Comparing the Lamb and the Tyger in In Songs of Innocence592 Words   |  3 PagesComparing the Lamb and the Tyger in In Songs of Innocence Children embody the very essence of innocence. They see the world through virgin eyes, hear life with fresh ears and create the world with a simple mind and pure heart. It is about the only time in a persons life when the weight of sin, corruption, egotism, and hatred are not blurring their vision and thoughts. It is the only time a person is completely free. But this state of innocence becomes separated and exiled once experienceRead MoreChanged Forever Essay890 Words   |  4 PagesChanged Forever For years, I have wanted to visit the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum. My youngest son had been there and was immensely touched by this. Therefore, I determined this assignment would be the perfect opportunity for me to visit and in turn write about it. Immediately, in all honesty, I understood that this memorial and museum were a dedication of peace and hope that will change you forever. The museum is a place of amazing transformation that offers a uniqueRead MoreAnalysis Of The Wars, Bytimothy Findley, And William Faulkner s Two Soldiers1073 Words   |  5 Pages Innocences are often lost during childhood. People face maturity which cannot be learned at once, rather it s achieved through out ones life. In â€Å"The Wars† byTimothy Findley, and William Faulkner’s â€Å"Two Soldiers† the authors deliberately wants to represent the idea that maturing is continuous. In the short story â€Å"Two Soldiers† the young boy’s name is not given, and is grown in a common family. Faulkner wants anybody to relate this boy therefore the boy’s name is not shown. The two brave gentle

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Alexanders Conquests Essay Example For Students

Alexanders Conquests Essay The Conquests of Alexander the GreatAlexander was the son of King Philip II of Macedonia born approximately on July20th in 356 BC. His mother was Olympias, a young princess from Epirus. Alexander wasa remarkable person who loved to recite Homeric poetry. At age fourteen his father senthim to study science, mathematics, and philosophy with Aristotle of Stagira. Alexanderlooked up to Aristotle like a father, and it can later be seen that Aristotle gaveAlexander the knowledge it took to be one of the greatest rulers in history. Alexander wasa man of extremes and contradictions. At times he would have intense spurts of energyand then long sulks. He showed extreme generosity and at the same time murderouscruelty against former friends. One would guess given common knowledge that hisinsecurities most likely were originated in his childhood; perhaps the relationship with hisAfter the assassination of his father, King Philip II, Alexander was in direct line totake over as ruler. Alexander wa s to go down in history as the father of the Hellenicworld, the unopposed leader of the Greek world, and last but not least the Great, atitle given for his numerous victories. The mobile elite was Alexanders Companion Cavalry consisting primarily of thecream of the Macedonian aristocracy. The backbone of the army was the phalanx.2 Thephalanx was six infantry brigades, capable of fighting a compilation of different types ofwarfare, but specializing in set-piece battle in an eight-deep hedgehog formation with fiveand a half meter-long spears. The phalanx was the main weapon of warfare; yet, therewere also specialist units: skirmishers, archers, and light infantry with mountain training. There were also units comprised of non-Macedonian Greeks whom, fighting forAlexander, helped justify Alexanders claim to be the General in Chief of the army ofAlexanders Army also had very important back-up units. These units carried asiege train consisting of mobile siege towers, stone-throwing catapults, and javelinthrowers. Also comprised in the back-up units were engineers, bridge-builders, sappers,and surveyors. To further insure a well developed army there needed to be non-combatantpersonnel as well. They comprised of doctors, scientists, botanists, astronomers,philosophers, seers, and an official historian record all of the conquests. With this unifiedand flawless army Alexander would be able to conquer many lands with great speed andIn the same aspect that most of our armies of today say prayers for a victory inbattle so was Alexanders belief that a homage must be paid to a god for good luck. In thebeginning of his journey, Alexander rode up to the city of Troy where he enter ed thearchaic temple of the goddess Athena. Here he made a promise that if successful, hewould return to little Ilion and build a gigantic temple to Trojan Athene in gratitude forher help. This visit would give him the additional benefit of the spirits of the Ancients inAlexander and his army swiftly marched the plains along the Sea of Marmara. Atthe same time Darius, the King of Persia, was busily setting traps in plans to stop thepursuit of Alexanders army. Darius had a plan to stop them, he would station severalthousand Greek mercenaries near the Dardanelles. The Persian army had vast resourcesand great gold reserves to hire army after army to defeat Alexanders pursuit. The leaderof the Greek mercenaries, Memnon of Rhodes, decided to burn the countryside to cut offAlexanders supplies. The Persian leaders decided against this idea and decided to fightAt dusk, Alexander approached the river in battle formation. On the opposite sidewere the Persians lining the bank ten thousand stro ng. The Persian plan was just to hold Alexander off and prevent him from crossing the river. Alexanders senior generalParmenio counseled Alexander that they should hold off until the time was right. Alexander refused and within minutes the blaring trumpets roared as they marched oninto battle. Alexander launched a small attack of fifteen-hundred men to make thePersians believe the real battle had started. They fell for it and soon the Persians had lostthe majority of their men along the banks. Alexander then proceeded in sending in hiselite cavalry squadrons down into the river and across into the face of his enemies. Several of the Persian officers tried to kill Alexander himself, in the attempt eight werekilled, including Dariuss son-in-law. The Greek mercenaries, meanwhile, who were among the Persians best troopswatched the battle at the river Granicus. The Persian cavalry retreated and among themidst came Alexanders companion cavalry heading straight for them. The phalanx wasset up and war against the mercenaries ensued into the night. The mercenaries were cut inhalf before finally surrendering. They were then sent in chains to hard labor for life in thesilver mines of Thrace. This was Alexanders way of sending a grim message to any otherGreeks considering joining the Persians.5Memnon, now Dariuss commander-in-chief of Western operations, was settingup once again in anticipation of Alexanders arrival. With him were the Athenianmercenary commanders Ephialtes and Thrasybulos, two men who had been onAlexanders hit list for quite some time. This time they believed they had the bestdefenses to defe at Alexanders army. Their town was a fortress fortified by a huge wallwinding up into the hills above Boldrum. It had two or three main gates and the lowground was protected by deep ditches; it also had forts above the harbor and out in thebay was a fleet of four hundred ships. This place was so fortified that it was almostimpossible to get in. Fortunately Alexander who had just about any type of weaponimaginable of this period used his siege-technology6 to gain entrance. Alexander attacked on the flat ground first on the east side of town. His armyattempted to get in through the wall but this soon failed. Alexander then used his siegetechnology to wage war and gain entrance. Memnon launched a massive raid at dawn toovertake Alexanders army. This was almost a stalemate until Alexanders reserve armycame in and inflicted heavy losses, and Ephialtes was killed. Memnon realizing his defeatretreated and evacuated his forces by sea, setting fire to everything they could not takewith them on the ships. Alexander emerges victorious again. Although Alexanders troops had suffered severe losses they still pursued on. Computer Forensic Sample EssayAlexander achieved his goal and captured the great city of Persopolis yet he wasnot yet satisfied. He still wanted Darius dead or alive. In July Alexander pursued in aquest to find Darius. He marched on in the sweltering heat across the Great Salt Deserttowards Afghanistan. Finally after a long an arduous journey, Alexander reached a placecalled Thara in which he learned that Darius had been overthrown by his owncommanders the night before. Eager to still pursue Darius, Alexander pressed on throughthe Ahuran pass. By the time Alexander caught up with the Persian leaders, they werealready fleeing. At the same time they stabbed Darius and left him there for dead. One ofAlexanders soldiers met up with him and gave him some water. Darius conveyed amessage to Alexander thanking him for his honorable treatment of his mother and familythroughout all this. Darius was dead by the time Alexander got there. Alexander coveredthe body with his cloak and was shocked by the premature death of the King of theAlexander would go on through many different cities conquering anything in hisway for the next three years. In the spring of 327 BC Alexander and his troops invadedIndia.12 They first went to Taxila and met some opposition; but in a few minutes KingAmbi of Taxila welcomed Alexander to his new conquest. Alexander stayed here shortlyand then pressed on to the Battle on the Jhelum River. The opposition was the Indianarmy led by Rajah Porus consisting of 30,000 men. Alexanders army pressed on acrossthe river Jhelum and soon through a tough battle defeated Poruss army. The mostpersonal loss of this war was Alexanders beloved horse Bucephalus who died fromwounds in battle. It was here that Alexander named the town after his war-horse. The majority of Alexanders army, tired from battles and homesick, decided theywould not push any further into the rest of India or in their time the ends of the Earth asthey knew it. Alexander, after giving the idea serious thought, decided that he needed totake over the rest of India before heading home to Macedonia. The army agreed and theymoved out plowing through city by city until they made their way back to Susa in 324BC. In the journey from Susa to Babylon Alexander met with some Chaldean wise menwho told him that their god Bel had told them that for the king to enter the city at thistime would be fatal to him. They urged him not to go westward now but to go eastwardinstead. Alexander bypassed Babylon for a while but the sceptic Anaxagoras told the kingto disregard the curse and press through in despite the curse. Anaxagoras was soon put todeath after Alexander learned of his plot to get him to enter Babylon and be killed. Whilein Babylon, Alexander developed a strong distrust with his friends and he started drinkingvery heavily. Alexander drank to forget himself for two days and then he developed araging fever. With this fever he became delirious and thirsty, so he drank more. In the en dhe died from this ravaging fever on June 10th 323 BC at the age of thirty-two. The fevermost likely was brought about by strychnine poisoning in the unmixed wine or possiblyby liver failure due to extreme drinking. Nevertheless a great man had died and with hima legacy for all the world to remember: Alexander the Great King of the World.13Bibliography:Bamm, Peter. Alexander the Great: Power as DestinyNew York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1968Chambers, Mortimer. The Western ExperienceNew York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1974Dupuy, Trevor Nevitt. The Military Life of Alexander the Great of MacedonNew York: Franklin Watts, Inc., 1969Fox, Robin Lane. Alexander the GreatPenguin Publishing, USA., 1994Green, Peter. Alexander of Macedon 356-323 B.C.: A Historical BiographyUniversity of California Press, 1992Hammond, N.G.L. The Genius of Alexander the GreatUniversity of North Carolina Press, 1997Higgins, Andrew. To Buoy Itself Up, Besieged Macedonia Is Grasping at HistoryWall Street Journal: Fri day, April 9, 1999; front pageMercer, Charles. Alexander the GreatNew York: American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc., 1962Rice, E. E. Alexander the GreatSutton Publishing, Inc., 1997Wood, Michael. In The Footsteps of Alexander the GreatBerkeley: University of California Press, 1997

Friday, April 17, 2020

the mormons Essays - Latter Day Saint Movement, Christian Movements

The Mormons I have learned an array of things from watching these videos about Mormonism. I learned a great deal about joseph smith and who he was along with the importance he brings to Mormonism. I was unaware of his very first vison. Joseph was 14 years old and he only shared his vision within the confines of family and only choose to tell his parents what he sa w. I later than realized that his vison was changed three timed and each time it was more elaborate. His third vison was the one that made it into the Book of Mormon. I find Mormonism extremely interesting because there is a number of differences and additions added to the bible and advertised as Mormonism. Mormons would devote their lives to following Joseph Smith. These families would relocate and do anything according to Joseph Smith . While I watched these videos, the term "Mountain massacre" was mentioned so I decided to do some research on this tragedy. The historian Geoffrey Ward has called this tragedy the "the most hideous example of the human cost exacted by religious fanaticism in American history until 9/11.'' Although it might not be a major tourist destination, for a century and a half the massacre at Mountain Meadows has been the main debate among Mormons and the people of Utah. In Sept. 1857, in southwestern Utah, a local militia of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or Mormons, attacked a wagon train of Arkansas families headed for California. After five days , the militia persuaded the families to surrender under a flag of truce and a pledge of safe passage. Then, approximately 140 men, women and children were slaughtered and killed right then and there. Now, 146 years later, the descendants and the victims of relatives have been asking for an apology from the Mormon church. The fact of the matter is that these individuals " Believ ed they were doing God's work in ridding the world of ''infidels ". These evangelical Mormon committed one of the greatest civilian atrocities on American soil. Without a sustained attempt at accountability and atonement, the church will not escape the hovering shadow of that horrible crime " ( New York Times). Polygamy is something I was more than aware of with the Mormon religion, but I learned so much more about why It started and it "religious" intentions behind i t . Many would argue it was started by Joseph Smith out of convenience for his own personal sexual behavior, so that it would not be condemned by G od . Many argued that Joseph Smith was told by God that it was acceptable because men like Abraham in the bible practiced polygamy. Many that choose to not engage in this act of polygamy were forced to accept it or not become members of the church. P olygamy was finally addressed and enforced and was defined as illegal. For me, It was extremely hard to understand why so many people followed Joseph Smith, and then when he was murdered to continue on and then follow others like Brigham Young. In Comparison, Mormonism does not a line with Christianity . First as Christians, we believe that Christ died on the cross for our salvation, this is not a belief of the Mormon faith. Mormon ideology does not follow the belief of the Trinity, as we do. Mormon's believe God the Father, His son Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost are three different people. We as Christian s read the bible and as the word and truth of God, Mormons have other books that they believe in, the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price. Modern Mormons regard God as plural. The belief of salvation is very different then the Christianity belief. Mormons believe they can achieve to become a God which is called " exaltation " . This is not a practice in any other form of Christian beliefs. Mormonism has me question so many things and it is so hard for me to wrap my head around their belief system. There additions do the bible is the reason why they believe that

Friday, March 13, 2020

Free Essays on Psychological Variables Of Coaching In Sports

The Psychological Variables of Coaching in Sports I have been playing baseball all my life. I went to Holy Ghost Prep High School, and played on the varsity baseball team my junior and senior years, starting at third base and I also was our team’s closing pitcher. As a junior, my team had an incredible amount of talent. Four of our seniors went on to play division one baseball. Throughout the year, however, we experienced many obstacles, most stemming from player-coaching relationships. The players constantly ripped our head coach, and never bought into what he preached. Nonetheless, we ended up winning our division (which was not a big accomplishment) and were picked to win the district tournament and maybe even win the state tournament as well. However, we lost in the first round to an inferior team, because, I believe, of the team’s inability to get along with our head coach. During my senior year, we had only one player who would play division one baseball; we were made up of a bunch of average role players who mostly played on junior varsity the year before. Although our third basemen was a stud (being me), we were not even picked to win our division, let alone do anything in the district tournament. Since, unlike the previous year’s team, we bought into our coaches’ philosophy, and we ended up beating three top-quality teams, and ended up reaching the district finals. Thus, in my presentation, I will explore the question of how much exactly does coaching play a role in a team’s success, and the other psychological factors that encompass the role of a coach. The best examples to prove that coaching is indeed an important instrument to a team’s success, perhaps even greater than the talent of the team, are the instances of a coach coming to a good team and making them great, or a coach coming to a bad team and making them contenders. Perhaps the greatest example of this is of Phil Jackson coming to t... Free Essays on Psychological Variables Of Coaching In Sports Free Essays on Psychological Variables Of Coaching In Sports The Psychological Variables of Coaching in Sports I have been playing baseball all my life. I went to Holy Ghost Prep High School, and played on the varsity baseball team my junior and senior years, starting at third base and I also was our team’s closing pitcher. As a junior, my team had an incredible amount of talent. Four of our seniors went on to play division one baseball. Throughout the year, however, we experienced many obstacles, most stemming from player-coaching relationships. The players constantly ripped our head coach, and never bought into what he preached. Nonetheless, we ended up winning our division (which was not a big accomplishment) and were picked to win the district tournament and maybe even win the state tournament as well. However, we lost in the first round to an inferior team, because, I believe, of the team’s inability to get along with our head coach. During my senior year, we had only one player who would play division one baseball; we were made up of a bunch of average role players who mostly played on junior varsity the year before. Although our third basemen was a stud (being me), we were not even picked to win our division, let alone do anything in the district tournament. Since, unlike the previous year’s team, we bought into our coaches’ philosophy, and we ended up beating three top-quality teams, and ended up reaching the district finals. Thus, in my presentation, I will explore the question of how much exactly does coaching play a role in a team’s success, and the other psychological factors that encompass the role of a coach. The best examples to prove that coaching is indeed an important instrument to a team’s success, perhaps even greater than the talent of the team, are the instances of a coach coming to a good team and making them great, or a coach coming to a bad team and making them contenders. Perhaps the greatest example of this is of Phil Jackson coming to t...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

How to Stop Nuclear Terrorism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

How to Stop Nuclear Terrorism - Essay Example High grade traditional explosives and electrical and mechanical equipment are used to set off a nuclear bomb. Hydrogen bomb, which is thousands of times much more powerful than an atom bomb has not been used in war anywhere. A nuclear explosion, deliberate or accidental, would lead to release of energy millions of times greater than that of dynamite or RDX, causing so much of heat and pressure, called as 'thermal radiation', that all materials are converted into compressed gases accompanied with a tremor wave. The explosion produces highly penetrating gamma rays, which would travel long distance in seconds, cannot be felt by human beings, causing fatal long term effect on human bodies or those of other living beings. In first ever use of nuclear bombs by America in second world war, it is estimated that as many as 140,000 had died in Hiroshima by the bomb and its post explosion effects, with the estimate for Nagasaki roughly 75,000., majority of the deaths were those of civilians. In estimating the number of deaths caused by the attacks, many victims died in the following months or years after the bombing as a result of radiation exposure. Today's nuclear bombs are thousand times much more destructive than those dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The world's first nuclear explosion was achieved with plutonium, a man-made element produced in nuclear reactors. Plutonium is created when an atom of uranium-238 is hit by a neutron and becomes plutonium-239. Nuclear reactor, which is used to generate power or propel marine vehicles generates the neutrons in a controlled chain reaction. For the neutrons to be absorbed by the uranium their speed must be slowed by passing them through a substance known as a "moderator." Graphite and heavy water are used as moderators in reactors fueled by natural uranium. Heavy water contains an atom of deuterium instead of an atom of hydrogen. 4 kilograms of Plutonium would be needed to make a bomb with a beryllium reflector. Countries producing plutonium for weapons have generally operated their reactors to maximize the production of plutonium-239-the isotope most useful for nuclear weapons. Weapon-grade plutonium contains less than 7 percent plutonium-240. Under normal nuclear power plant operation, the plutonium in spent reactor fuel contains roughly 24 percent plutonium-240; such plutonium is often referred to as "reactor-grade." However, essentially all isotopic mixtures of plutonium-including reactor-grade plutonium-can be used for nuclear weapons. In order to use plutonium in nuclear weapons or nuclear fuel, however, it must be separated from the rest of the spent fuel in a reprocessing facility. Plutonium separation is easier than uranium enrichment because it involves separating different elements rather than different isotopes of the same element. It uses well-known chemical separation techniques. Relatively large amounts of plutonium-240, as would be contained in reactor-grade plutonium, can cause a weapon to detonate early and "fizzle," causing a smaller explosion than intended. However, even a weapon that fizzles would cause an explosion roughly equivalent to 1,000 tons (1 kiloton) of TNT. A weapon of this size could kill tens of thousands of people if detonated in a city, which clearly demonstrates that even reactor-grade plu